First aid treatment - tips from the experts

No matter how prepared you are and how many precautions you take, things can go wrong and people can get sick, have accidents, injure themselves, get bitten by something - you name it. Don't let this stifle your sense of adventure and stop you and your kids from experiencing the rough and tumble of life.

Camping first aid cr Depositphotos 5695605 xl 2015 1

For those times when things don't quite go our way, we have listed below informative articles from trusted sources on typical medical conditions and emergencies you might come across on your camping adventures, including appropriate first aid responses. This article is provided subject to our Disclaimer.

Many of these situations are rare, and some extremely so, but advanced knowledge in being able to provide the right kind of first aid assistance is important and reassuring.

Emergency responses 

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first-aid technique that can be used if someone is not breathing properly or if their heart has stopped.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

First aid basics and DRSABCD

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Pressure Immobilisation Bandage (how to apply)

Pressure-immobilisation is recommended for bites from all Australian snakes, including sea snakes, funnel web spider bites, blue-ringed octopus stings and cone shell stings.

Continue reading on the NSW Poisons Information Centre website 

Recovery position

If someone is breathing but unconscious or non-responsive, they should be placed in the recovery position to help prevent suffocation from an obstructed airway.

View the St John Ambulance Australia recovery position instructions 

Bites and stings

Insect bites and stings

It can be difficult to know if a bite or a sting from an insect is dangerous or not. This article explains the best first aid treatment depending on the type of insect involved.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Sea creature bites and stings

It can be difficult to know if a bite or sting from a sea creature is dangerous or not. This article explains the best first aid treatment depending on the creature involved.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Snake bites

It can be difficult to know if a bite from a snake is dangerous or not. This article explains the best first aid treatment depending on the type of snake involved.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Spider bites

It can be difficult to know if a bite from a spider is dangerous or not. This article explains the best first aid treatment depending on the type of spider involved.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Stinging plants

The beach is one of Australia’s most recognisable and enjoyable features. Here is how can we enjoy a day at the beach safely and help prevent accidents or injury.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Infections and illnesses

Diarrhoea and vomiting in children

It can be very concerning to see your baby or child having bouts of diarrhoea and vomiting. This helpful information aims to explain some of the common causes and strategies to help you alleviate your child’s symptoms.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Fever and high temperatures in children

Fevers are quite common in young children and are usually mild. Sometimes the causes of a fever will require urgent attention, but in most cases they can be managed at home.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis, also known as ‘gastro’, is a common illness that can cause vomiting and diarrhoea. Many types of gastro are easily spread. Gastro is not usually serious, but it can make you very dehydrated. Milder forms can be managed at home by drinking fluids.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Temperature and weather related conditions

Dehydration

Dehydration occurs when you don't have enough fluids in your body. If severe, dehydration can cause serious problems. If you suspect you are (or someone else is) severely dehydrated, seek medical attention.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Frostbite

Frostbite occurs when the tissues of the skin freeze. This can happen during prolonged exposure to cold weather, or even after a few minutes in extremely low temperatures.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Hot weather risks and staying cool

We live in a sunburnt country where hot days and heatwaves can stress our bodies. Here's how to stay cool and hydrated.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Hypothermia

If you are exposed to prolonged cold conditions, whether outdoors or in an unheated house, you can get hypothermia. You are at greater risk if you are elderly, very young, underweight, or in poor health.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Sunburn and sun protection

Sunburn is the skin's reaction to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. You can see sunlight and feel heat (infrared radiation), but you can't see or feel UV radiation. It can damage your skin even on cool, cloudy days.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Heatstroke

Heatstroke is a life-threatening condition in which the body overheats when it can no longer maintain a healthy temperature. The high body temperature in heatstroke can lead to organ damage. You can avoid heatstroke by taking precautions in very hot weather.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Injuries, accidents and other

Anaphylaxis

Cases of severe allergic reactions to triggers, for example food or bites and stings, can lead to anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is very serious and can be fatal.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Bleeding

Bleeding is the loss of blood from the circulatory system. Causes can range from small cuts and abrasions to deep cuts and amputations. Injuries to the body can also result in internal bleeding, which can range from minor (seen as superficial bruising) to massive bleeds.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Burns and scalds

Burns are common. At first, it can be difficult to tell how deep a burn is, because it can take around two weeks for a burn area to fully develop.

Continue reading on the Australian Government's Health Direct website 

Cardiac arrest / heart attack

To perform its duties, the heart muscle needs a generous supply of oxygen and nutrients, which it receives from blood pumped through the coronary arteries and their branches. A heart attack occurs when a blood clot blocks one or more of the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Choking

Air enters the lungs via the trachea (windpipe). Choking is caused when a foreign object, like a hard lump of food or a marble, goes into the trachea instead of the oesophagus (food pipe).

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Cuts and abrasions

Skin is the largest organ of the human body. It is soft to allow movement, but tough enough to resist breaking or tearing. It varies in texture and thickness from one part of the body to the next. It consists of two main layers – the epidermis and the dermis.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Fractures (bones)

A broken bone or bone fracture occurs when a force exerted against a bone is stronger than the bone can bear. This disturbs the structure and strength of the bone, and leads to pain, loss of function and sometimes bleeding and injury around the site.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

Sprains and strains

Soft tissue injuries may be sudden (acute) or get worse gradually (chronic). Healing can take from less than seven days for a small muscle strain, up to more than 12 months for a significant ACL sprain.

Continue reading on the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel website 

 
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